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Moderna vaccine reports 100% efficacy against severe COVID

Update

Moderna has reported further results of their Phase 3 COVID vaccine study. The results, based on 30,000 participants, included 196 cases of COVID-19, of which 30 cases were severe. According to the company, the vaccine's efficacy was 94.1 per cent overall. The data also suggest the vaccine is 100 per cent effective against severe COVID-19. Moderna also announced it will request Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and apply for a conditional marketing authorisation with the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

This article was published on
December 1, 2020

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https://investors.modernatx.com/news-releases/news-release-details/moderna-announces-primary-efficacy-analysis-phase-3-cove-study

Expert Comments: 

Professor William (Bill) Rawlinson

The Moderna vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 is a significant advance and will be very important to see the full data. The efficacy is very exciting, and clearly needs to be reviewed. That notwithstanding, it is consistent with the other mRNA vaccine results, and represents a truly exciting prospect.

This is one of the first mRNA vaccines in humans, and the relative benefits of such vaccines around production, licensing and expansion are tremendous. The ability to use the technology in different settings, and as demonstrated, the ability to rapidly develop these vaccines is a significant step forward.

Given the different vaccines now in development, and the results of these trials to date, it is to be hoped the low adverse effect trials have shown so far will continue into larger population studies. Continued monitoring of these programs post-delivery of vaccines will be important.

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