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If someone already got the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, should they be worried? Are there symptoms they should watch for?

This article was published on
April 14, 2021

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SciLine reaches out to our network of scientific experts and poses commonly asked questions about newsworthy topics. Reporters can use these responses in news stories, with attribution to the expert.

SciLine reaches out to our network of scientific experts and poses commonly asked questions about newsworthy topics. Reporters can use these responses in news stories, with attribution to the expert.

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What our experts say

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Media Release

Expert Comments: 

Beth Kirkpatrick, MD

Given how rare the blood clotting event is, right now thought to be less than one in a million, individuals who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine should be aware but recognize it is extremely unlikely they will be affected. In the first one to four days after vaccination, vaccinated persons should anticipate the known side effects from this vaccine—including the low-grade fever, chills, aches, mild headache, injection site soreness. These are expected and not the symptoms associated with these rare clotting events. Symptoms of concern occur anywhere from five days to three weeks after vaccination, and include severe headache with or without vomiting, any new neurologic or stroke-like symptoms, or other new symptoms including easy bruising, red dot-like rash, severe abdominal pain, and trouble breathing.

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