BACK

Can wearing glasses help protect from getting infected with COVID-19?

This article was published on
April 21, 2021

This explainer is more than 90 days old. Some of the information might be out of date or no longer relevant. Browse our homepage for up to date content or request information about a specific topic from our team of scientists.

Because the news about this vaccine is still early, there is still a lot we don't know. Remaining questions include when the vaccine might be available for everyone, if it will work in children younger than 12 (as they have been excluded from the early trials), if it will stop the virus from spreading in people who are infected but don't have any symptoms (asymptomatic), if it will prevent people from developing severe cases, and how long the vaccine might offer protection from the the virus.

Because the news about this vaccine is still early, there is still a lot we don't know. Remaining questions include when the vaccine might be available for everyone, if it will work in children younger than 12 (as they have been excluded from the early trials), if it will stop the virus from spreading in people who are infected but don't have any symptoms (asymptomatic), if it will prevent people from developing severe cases, and how long the vaccine might offer protection from the the virus.

Publication

What our experts say

Because the news about this vaccine is still early, there is still a lot we don't know. Remaining questions include when the vaccine might be available for everyone, if it will work in children younger than 12 (as they have been excluded from the early trials), if it will stop the virus from spreading in people who are infected but don't have any symptoms (asymptomatic), if it will prevent people from developing severe cases, and how long the vaccine might offer protection from the the virus.

Context and background

Previous research published before the pandemic found that people may involuntarily touch their eyes several times per hour. A study from China was published in mid-September 2020 where researchers suggested that wearing glasses may prevent people from touching their eyes, and recommended paying more attention to potential COVID-19 exposure through the eyes.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, public health and medical experts have recommended that everyone try to avoid touching their face and eyes, whether they wear glasses or not, to reduce the possibility of contaminated hands infecting the body. This recommendation complements other recommendations to keep hands clean with regular hand washing or sanitizing, and to maintain distance from other people when possible.

Resources

  1. Association of Daily Wear of Eyeglasses With Susceptibility to Coronavirus Disease 2019 Infection (JAMA)
  2. Face touching: a frequent habit that has implications for hand hygiene (American Journal of Infection Control)

Media briefing

Media Release

Expert Comments: 

No items found.

Q&A

No items found.