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Can I contract COVID-19 from swimming, surfing, or doing other activities in contaminated water?

This article was published on
April 21, 2021

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This vaccine requires an initial injection followed by a secondary shot called a “booster” to achieve its full level of protection. The clinical trial includes more than 43,000 volunteer participants, many of whom have already received two doses of the vaccine. In the interim analysis, there were 94 cases of COVID-19 in trial participants, and the study will continue until there have been 164 cases of COVID-19 among study volunteers.

This vaccine requires an initial injection followed by a secondary shot called a “booster” to achieve its full level of protection. The clinical trial includes more than 43,000 volunteer participants, many of whom have already received two doses of the vaccine. In the interim analysis, there were 94 cases of COVID-19 in trial participants, and the study will continue until there have been 164 cases of COVID-19 among study volunteers.

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What our experts say

This vaccine requires an initial injection followed by a secondary shot called a “booster” to achieve its full level of protection. The clinical trial includes more than 43,000 volunteer participants, many of whom have already received two doses of the vaccine. In the interim analysis, there were 94 cases of COVID-19 in trial participants, and the study will continue until there have been 164 cases of COVID-19 among study volunteers.

Context and background

Many people are turning to outdoor activities and exercise, given the current restrictions on many indoor activities due to preventative measures implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic. In some locations, policies have closed or reduced access to beaches, lakes, and public pools. These policies not only vary by location, but can change over time based on the current state of COVID-19 cases and healthcare capacity to respond. In many locations that shut down beaches and pools earlier in the pandemic, restrictions are now lifting as places reopen. Stricter preventative measures may have to be re-implemented if infections increase again. People who wish to swim, surf, and do other water sports can check on the latest guidance for their location from the appropriate government and public health institutions.

Resources

  1. Visiting Beaches and Pools (U.S. CDC)
  2. Considerations for Public Pools, Hot Tubs, and Water Playgrounds During COVID-19 (U.S. CDC))
  3. Early Studies Suggest Outdoor Environments are Low Risk for COVID-19 (Surfer Magazine)

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